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WISER Tutorial Video Transcripts

The following transcripts are provided for the WISER tutorial videos.

Introduction to WISER

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[Introduction Music]

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WISER, an acronym for the Wireless Information System for Emergency Responders, is a resource first responders use

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to figure out how to deal with hazardous material incidents like accidents involving tanker trucks or chemical plants.

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When first responders arrive at situations involving hazardous materials, they have to quickly assess the situations in order to protect

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people and the environment. To do this, they rely on information from several sources, as well as common sense and environmental

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factors like wind direction.var

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WISER aggregates the information into a useful application for Apple and Android devices as well as desktop computers and online at

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WebWISER.nlm.nih.gov
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It then couples the information from those trusted resources with useful tools like an interactive protective distance map and

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comprehensive decision support which provides first responders with the resources and knowledge to save lives and minimize the

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impact on the environment and physical property. This video

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briefly overviews key features of WISER’s iPhone version for a 1st responder. Specific tutorial videos are planned for the future.

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WISER gathers chemical, biological and radiological information from a lot of sources including the National Library of Medicine’s

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Hazardous Substances Data Bank, known as the HSDB, CHEMM, and REMM resources as well as the Department of Transportation’s

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Hazardous Substances Data Bank, known as the HSDB, CHEMM, and REMM resources as well as the Department of Transportation’s

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Emergency Response Guidebook 2016, and the WMD Response Guidebook.

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The first time you use WISER, it asks you to select a profile that best describes you,

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this customizes your home screen and substance data to focus on information that you are more likely to use.

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To later change your selection, touch Settings.

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We’ll start with a quick explanation of Search Known Substances.

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If you come to a scene and know exactly what substance you’re dealing with you can search for that substance by name or identifier.

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Touch the name when it appears,

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this screen links to lots of information that you might otherwise have to look for using several resources including the Emergency Response

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Guidebook, the NFPA, Protective Distance information, and a protective distance map.

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Another likely situation is arriving at an incident and not knowing what the substance is that you are trying to control, contain or treat.

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If this happens, touch Help Identify Unknown Chemical.

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From here, enter any criteria you know to filter potential hazards by properties and symptoms.

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Use the NFPA diamond and transport information to reduce potential results.

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When you reduce the number of chemicals to a manageable list, you can touch each one to learn more about it. When you select one, the

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same page opens that you saw when you touched a Known Substance from the home page. WISER gives you several different ways

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to identify and address hazmat situations.

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WISER also includes NLM’s CHEMM (an acronym for Chemical Hazards Emergency Medical Management).

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CHEMM-IST, the CHEMM Intelligent Syndromes tool, is a prototype decision support tool developed by experts in medicine and emergency

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response as an aid for identifying the chemical a patient was exposed to in a mass casualty incident.

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The last features that we’ll look at in this overview are the radiological tools. They include a dose estimator and radiation unit

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converter as well as quick references for emergency contacts and a list of onsite activities. The section includes content from

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NLM’s Radiation Emergency Medical Management known as the REMM tool and the Radiological Terrorism

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Emergency Management pocket guide for Clinicians.

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WISER, developed by the National Library of Medicine at the National Institutes of Health, strives to aggregate the resources emergency

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responders need and provide those resources in easy to use ways that help protect you and the people you fearlessly protect.

Known Substance

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WISER, the Wireless Information System for Emergency Responders, is a resource first responders use to figure out how to deal with

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hazardous material incidents like accidents involving tanker trucks or chemical plants.
This video explains Search Known Substances,

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which allows you to delve quickly into WISER’s deep set of substance information.
Let’s get started, when you touch Search

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Known Substances, you can search simply by name; or by the chemical registry number known as the CAS RN; the UN/NA, which is the

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United Nations/North America transportation ID; the Standard Transportation Commodity Codes, known as STCC rail car identifiers—notice that

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search looks for your term anywhere in the substance name so if you enter Dioxide, Carbon Dioxide will appear in your search results.

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Another feature is that search maintains a history, so that you can quickly access your recent substance searches.

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WISER offers comprehensive overviews and instructions for about 500 substances; it aggregates information from many sources

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including the National Library of Medicine’s Hazardous Substances Data Bank and the Emergency Response Guidebook 2016. For

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example, hydrogen chloride. You’ll see small and large isolation zones covered in the green pages of the ERG as well as isolation zones for

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example, hydrogen chloride. You’ll see small and large isolation zones covered in the green pages of the ERG as well as isolation zones for

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specific types of containers for some substances this information is provided data directly from the ERG Guidebook.

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If you encounter a substance that is not in the WISER database, you can still access the Emergency Response Guidebook information for

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that substance. For example, if you search for Hexaldehyde, the guide page for this substance is readily available.

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I mentioned that WISER includes massive amounts of information—we’ll go into more detail about that now. Starting with how that

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information is displayed. The first time you signed into WISER, it asked you to select a user profile. WISER customizes your list of hot

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links based on your user profile selection. All of its data is available to everyone but first responders will see a different list here than a

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hospital provider sees on their screen. So keep that in mind if I reference a hot link that isn’t at the top of your list. You still have it, it’s just

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under one of the other groupings.
As a first responder, suppose you arrive at an accident scene and see an overturned tanker

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that is clearly carrying Chlorine. There is a fire and the driver is injured. From this main Chlorine screen, you can access all of WISER’s

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information about the substance. When I touch Chlorine, all of WISER’s information about the substance appears—separated into useful

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sections. The first thing you’ll want to do is probably learn how to protect yourself. You will find handling instructions in the Equipment

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(PPE) section.

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Since you’re dealing with a fire, you need to quickly establish a protective distance. There are three ways to do this: touch the protective

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distance hot link, touch the protective action zone icon in the toolbar, or select the hazmat grouping and then touch protective distance.

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distance hot link, touch the protective action zone icon in the toolbar, or select the hazmat grouping and then touch protective distance.

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distance hot link, touch the protective action zone icon in the toolbar, or select the hazmat grouping and then touch protective distance.

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distance hot link, touch the protective action zone icon in the toolbar, or select the hazmat grouping and then touch protective distance.

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distance hot link, touch the protective action zone icon in the toolbar, or select the hazmat grouping and then touch protective distance.

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distance hot link, touch the protective action zone icon in the toolbar, or select the hazmat grouping and then touch protective distance.

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After entering location and wind direction as well as other information regarding the spill size, WISER returns protective distance isolation

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zones and a map—see the protective distance tutorial for specific instruction.

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Now, let’s treat the driver. The Clinical

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Symptoms section overviews signs and symptoms. Touch medical to learn more about treatment, health effects, OSHA Standards and

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much more. Fire Procedures explain how you should protect against and react to a fire.
If the substance you’re working with lists an

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Acute Care section, touch it. This is additional information from NLM’s CHEMM resource that focuses on Management and includes useful

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information like Agent identifiers, ABC reminders and pediatric vulnerabilities. The acute care section is only available for a small

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set of CHEMM substances.
Back at the scene of our chlorine spill, you notice the substance is mixing with water.

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WISER includes chemical reactivity tools that you can access from the hot link on the main chlorine page or from the Hazmat grouping. You

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can filter to find outcomes when the substance mixes with water or other chemicals. These factors can drastically change the way you

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approach a situation.
This hazmat grouping offers many other resources, touch NFPA Classification to see

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health, flammability, instability and special instructions.
From Chlorine’s main screen, a first responder

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to better protect yourself and the surrounding area. As we mentioned before, this information is available under its related groupings. Review

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each one to learn where to find the resources you need in an emergency.
The Environment section includes information

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about outcomes for aquatic life and the atmosphere; instructions for notify the National Response Center; non-human toxicity levels and

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ecotoxicity values.
The app also includes biological data. You can learn about signs and symptoms, indicators,

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treatment and other information aggregated from medical resources including the WMD Response Guidebook and imagery to help you

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figure out what you’re dealing with in a situation.
WISER, developed by the National Library of

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Medicine at the National Institutes of Health, strives to aggregate the resources emergency responders need and provide those resources in

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easy to use ways that help protect you and the people you fearlessly protect.

Protective Distance

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WISER is a resource first responders use to figure out how to deal with hazardous material incidents. This video demonstrates WISER’s

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Protective Distance Map, which uses the information gathered from a scene of an accident to walk you through the steps needed to isolate a

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spill, leak or fire and determine the appropriate isolation zone. Let’s get started.
As a first responder, you are called to the scene

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of an accident involving an overturned tanker. Upon arrival, you scan the area. The overturned tanker is leaking and clearly marked with

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“Chlorine (UN 1017)?. You need to create an appropriate perimeter.
With WISER, you can quickly assess the

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situation and set up a protective distance.
You saw the name of the substance on the side of the tank, select Search Known Substances.

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Enter Chlorine. Select “Protective Distance?. From here, you can view the isolation and protective action zone information that is available

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from the Emergency Response Guide Book 2016.
WISER will generate a Protective Distance Map

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from the information you provide Select the protective action zone icon at the bottom of the screen to enter the map mode. It should first take

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you to the settings where you enter your location and wind direction, which are required to plot the map. Select “plot? in the upper right to now

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display the map. The protective distance appears. After plotting, you may zoom in or out. Touch and hold anywhere on the map to move

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the plot to that location.
The radar icon will then allow you to access and alter additional details about the spill. There are

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a variety of other options that you can do to further customize your plot. Note that the options will vary for different substances.

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We are currently looking at the location of a large spill but we want to see what a smaller spill will look like at night. We can navigate back to the

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settings page by selecting the radar icon shown at the bottom of the screen. We can now enter the spill size for the new plot. We then navigate to

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the “time of day? option to select “night?, as we are interested in how the projected protective action zone may be different depending on the

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time of day.
Going back to the settings menu we can change the map type. Here we can select the Satellite

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view and go back to our plot. Now we might want to view our location in relation to the spill. Select the zoom icon, shown in the lower right, to open

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the zoom menu and change the map view. In the zoom menu, we see the options to show our current location or our location in relation to the

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spill. We will select “Show Spill and You?. We now can see both our location and the spill.

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Some substances map to more than one ERG material.

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An example of one of these is hydrogen cyanide or AC.

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We now click on the Protective Distance Map icon at the bottom of the screen. When we get to the options page we can

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see a selection for “MATERIAL TYPE?. This will display a menu to allow you to select the specific material combination or, if you do not have that

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information, to map the worst case distance.
This concludes the protective distance overview. WISER, developed by the National Library of

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Medicine at the National Institutes of Health, strives to aggregate the resources emergency responders need and provide those resources in easy to use ways that help protect you

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and the people you fearlessly protect.